Pros and Cons of Working with an EXTERNAL RECRUITER

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In last week’s post, I gave you a rundown of the pros and cons of working with an internal recruiter. This week we’ll be talking about EXTERNAL RECRUITERS, and what they can offer you.

First, here’s how an external recruiter operates:

- External recruiters are usually paid a percentage of the employees’ annual salary as a “finder’s fee” for bringing a hired candidate to an employer. Employers will often engage more than 1 recruiting firm to source qualified candidates from, so competition can be fierce.

-External recruiters will almost always handle the initial phone or face-to-face interview, and then it’s usually turned over to internal staff at the company. On rare occasions, they’ll manage the entire hiring process from start-to-finish.

Now let’s go over Pros and Cons:

PROS

-They have an outsider’s perspective, and can usually provide a “clear-eyed” view of what’s really going on at the company.

-They can offer crucial guidance on navigating personalities and company hiring issues to give you an edge over the competition.

-Your success means more money for them- that’s a POWERFUL motivator! Internal recruiters just don’t have the same level of incentive to get you hired.

CONS

-The same outsider mentality which can be a plus with a great external recruiter can also be a NEGATIVE with someone who’s not on top of the ball. Lack of knowledge about the company and key decision-makers can make it very difficult for you to get traction during the hiring process. This is why it’s crucial to listen and observe carefully during initial contact with an external recruiter- are they interested in YOU specifically, or is this one of dozens of calls they have on the books?

-To maximize their odds of placing a candidate, external recruiters will usually put forth multiple people for a job. As such, they may not promote you as aggressively.

-Some external recruiters may submit your resume for other open positions without your knowledge (or permission). This can cause unexpected problems. For example, if you’ve previously applied for a position independently, and then an external recruiter ALSO submits your candidacy for the same position, an employer may choose to skip you over entirely rather than deal with the headache of figuring out whether a commission is due to the recruiter on hiring. This is why SETTING CLEAR EXPECTATIONS are a must when working with an external recruiter.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

-Ultimately, an external recruiter has the exact same goal as you: getting you placed quickly, and for MAXIMUM compensation.

-Be honest with them about potential vulnerabilities- they can play a big role in mitigating the fallout and strengthening the overall impact of your presentation.

ONE MORE THING:

A relationship with an external recruiter can pay off for years to come. If they succeed in landing you a job, be sure to send a handwritten thank you note. Connect with them on LinkedIn. Periodically touch base during holidays and during milestone moments in your career. And the best value-add of all? Refer colleagues to them!

Ready to take your career to the next level?

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Pros and Cons of Working with an INTERNAL RECRUITER

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In my work with jobseekers, I often encounter a lack of basic understanding about recruiters. This can really hurt you when pursuing new career opportunities.

Here’s some information to quickly get you up-to-speed:

* Internal recruiters, also known as “corporate” recruiters, work within an organization. They usually get paid by the employer who has the available job.

* External recruiters, also known as “independent” recruiters, do not receive a paycheck from the employer who has the open job. They work for someone else, either a recruiting firm or agency, or simply for themselves.

Let’s go over the advantages (and possible disadvantages) of working with an INTERNAL RECRUITER:

PROS

-Insider perspective. They know how a company REALLY works and usually have deep relationships within the organization (including hiring managers).

-Getting introduced to the hiring manager by an internal recruiter is usually a signal that they’re SERIOUSLY INTERESTED In you for the job.

-They can get you on the “inside track” if convinced you’re the best person for the position.

-Sometimes they will even coach you in navigating the various personality types and hiring procedures within the company.

CONS

-Their allegiance is ultimately to the employer, and that can cause problems if you get caught in a clash between 2 key decision-makers, etc.

-You always need to watch yourself with an internal recruiter (because they’re always watching you). You can’t confide vulnerabilities and offer “straight talk” on concerns as you might do with an external recruiter.

-They will not hesitate to block you as a candidate if you try to go around them to the hiring manager.

KEY TAKEAWAY: You must ALWAYS present your strongest, most polished self when dealing with internal recruiters. They’re not “on your side” during the hiring process. Don’t ask for special favors, and don’t assume they have control over interview scheduling, salaries, etc.

I’ll give you the low-down on EXTERNAL RECRUITERS next week!

Ready to take your career to the next level?

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Ask Yourself These 3 Questions Before Accepting an Offer

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What’s the difference between a candidate who has a clear and powerful career “journey,” one marked by upward steps at each turn, and one whose background looks like it’s all over the map?

One difference is that candidate #1 is probably earning WAY more than candidate #2!

Another difference is that candidate #1, when presented with an offer, acts in accordance with LONG-TERM, not short-term goals.

Here are 3 important questions to ask yourself before accepting a new role:

1. How will my job title look to an outsider?

Can you easily explain that there are no Director titles even though you had Director-level responsibilities?

2. How will my department name look to an outsider?

If you want to get into Public Relations, but this job places you in the Internal Communications department, you might be creating a future issue.

3. What’s the job I want in 5 years?

In a small business, you get to wear many hats. But if your dream is to make a big impact at a large firm, how will you position yourself for more specialized roles? Or vice versa; you start in a large company, but are passionate about faster career growth in a start-up. How would you build skills and transferability for the future position?